Frequently Asked Questions

You can find here a list of the most frequently asked questions about energy.

To switch from one supplier to another
  • When is it possible to switch from one to another supplier?

    Thanks to the legislation of September 2012, every consumer living in Belgium has the possibility to switch from one supplier to another for free! There is only one rule: a 1 month resignation period must be respected. This period is used by the current supplier to end the contract of the leaving customer.

  • If I switch from one supplier to another, what are my obligations towards my current supplier?

    Nowadays, you have no obligation towards your current supplier since it is the new one that will take all the administrative steps for you (contact with your current supplier, with the DNO, transfer of your contract...).

  • If the duration of my contract is undetermined, when is it possible to make a supplier change?

    You can switch from one supplier to another whenever you want, unless you respect the notice period mentionned in you contract (usually one month). To switch, you can contact us on 04/242.47.82 or call the concerned supplier who is going to furnish you once the notice period is over.

  • If I have an electricity meter and a gas meter, may I have two different suppliers?

    Yes, you are free to choose two different suppliers.

  • If I change from supplier, is there any risk of electricity and/pr gas cut?

    When you switch from one supplier to another, there is no risk of electricity and/or gas cut. as a matter of fact, your distribution system operator (DSO) will ensure that your current supplier furnish you energy until the new supplier takes everything on its own. You are thus sure to get energy, whatever happens.

  • If I choose another supplier, do I have to change or replace my meter?

    Not at all. A meter change is not required. As a matter of fact, even if you choose another energy company (the one who delivers you electricity and/or gas), you are still connected to the same distribution network (the property of your distribution system operator or DSO).

Electricity and gas market in Belgium
  • What are the main actors of the energy market?

    In Belgium, there is three active actors in the energy market:

    • Transmission system operators (TSOs): this actor is in charge of the gas and/or electricity transport from the producer towards the distribution system operators (DSOs) and sometimes directly to big manufacturing consumers. The TSO for electricity is called Elia and the one for gas, Fluxys.
    • Distribution system operators (DSOs): they are in charge of the electricity (mid and low voltage) and gas (mid and low pressure) towards residentials and companies.
    • Suppliers: their main goal is to provide electricity and/or gas to consumers, whether they buy energy to producers or produce the energy themselves. They also propose services to their clients (the availability of the services depends from one to another supplier) and are in charge of the bills they send to consumers according to their consumption. You can find here the active energy suppliers available in Belgium.

    Besides, several official entities exist. They control and make the different actors of the market respect rules and standards:

    • At federal level: the Commission for Electricity and Gas Regulation (CREG): www.creg.be/en
    • In Flanders: the Vlaamse Reguleringsinstantie voor de Elektriciteits- en Gasmarkt (VREG): the Flemish regulator for electricity and gas, www.vreg.be/en
    • In Brussels: Bruxelles Gaz Electricité (Brugel) : www.brugel.be
    • In Wallonia: Commission Wallonne pour l'Energie (CWaPE), the Walloon energy Commission: www.cwape.be
  • Which advantages or disadvantages brought the energy market liberalisation?

    In Belgium, the energy market liberalisation occured twice. It first enters in force in Flanders, on July 1, 2003. Then, on January 1, 2007, the energy market liberalisation occured in Wallonia and in the Brussels-capital region. This procedure is aimed to open to free competition the job of electricity and gas supplier. It means that every company with a supply licence has now the possibility to deliver gas and electricity in Belgium.

    The liberalisation is an advantage for consumers since everybody may now choose the provider they want, which was previously not possible. If a family doesn't sign a contract with a specific supplier, the family is automatically provided by a "designated provider". In Flanders, it is usually Luminus or Engie-Electrabel and in Wallonia, Engie-Electrabel, Luminus or Essent.be.

  • what does "designated provider" mean?

    The designated provider is the automatically assigned provider by the distribution system operator (DSO) to avoid any gas and/or electricity supply shortage. Now, thanks to the liberalisation, you are free to pick the provider you want and you are not restricted anymore to the designated provider.

  • Do I have the obligation to choose a provider?

    No. To choose a provider is not mandatory since you will always be supplied by the designated provider (designated by your distribution system operator, DSO). It is important for you to know that you can, whenever you want, choose another provider and make a contract with that new provider. Nevertheless, keep in mind that you must respect a one month's notice period after the signature of the contract with your new provider.

  • What does your electricity bill consist of?

    The electricity price is divided in three parts:

    • The energy cost: it is the price that your energy provider charges you. It changes from one to another provider. This part of your bill is thus the one where you can negotiate according to the needs and the consumer consumption profile.
    • The distribution and transmission costs: this part of the bill goes to the distribution system operators (DSO's) and to the transport system operators (TSO's). Unlike the energy cost, the transmission and distribution costs are non-negotiable and must be approved by the Commission for Electricity and Gas Regulation (CREG). However, these costs can be different from one region to another, for example according to the population density since it will always be cheaper and easier to provide electricity in a town rather than in the countryside, where there are few houses.
    • Taxes and federal contribution: this last part is determined on a regional and federal basis and is, it goes without saying, not liberalised and non-negotiable.
  • What does your gas bill consist of?

    The gas price is divided in three parts:

    • The energy cost: it is the price that your energy provider charges you. It changes from one to another provider. This part of your bill is thus the one where you can negotiate according to the needs and the consumer consumption profile.
    • The distribution and transmission costs: this part of the bill goes to the distribution system operators (DSO's) and to the transport system operators (TSO's). Unlike the energy cost, the transmission and distribution costs are non-negotiable and must be approved by the Commission for Electricity and Gas Regulation (CREG). However, these costs can be different from one region to another, for example according to the population density since it will always be cheaper and easier to provide gas in a town rather than in the countryside, where there are few houses.
    • Taxes and federal contribution: this last part is determined on a regional and federal basis and is, it goes without saying, not liberalised and non-negotiable.
  • What does green electricity mean?

    Green electricity is the electricity produced out of renewable energy sources (RES) such as sun, wind, water, sustainable biomass... Unlike fossil energy sources (oil, gas...) and fissile materials (nuclear), the RES are unlimited and do not generate waste during the electricity production process. However, to chosse a provider with a "100% green electricity" proposal makes you not certain that 100% of the electricity you will consume in the future is actually produced out of RES.

    As mentionned by Test-Achats and Greenpeace: "According to the law, the provider has only to produce European documents – the "guarantees of origins" or GOs. These documents alows the provider to say that he delivers

What do I have to do if I move from one to another place?
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